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Visual Arts at Americas Society

Arts and Culture

Americas Society Gallery does not accept unsolicited submissions and materials. Our staff is not authorized to receive or review artist or exhibition proposals.

The Visual Arts program boasts the longest-standing private space in the U.S. dedicated to exhibiting and promoting art from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Canada; it has achieved a unique and renowned leadership position in the field, producing both historical and contemporary exhibitions. The Visual Arts program presents three exhibitions annually, each accompanied by a series of public and educational programs featuring outstanding artists, curators, critics and scholars. The Visual Arts program produces exhibition catalogues as well as scholarly publications, including the seminal work, A Principality of Its Own: 40 Years of Visual Arts at the Americas Society.

 

The Society’s Visual Arts department, dedicated to fostering a better understanding of art in the American regions beyond U.S. borders from the pre-Columbian era to the present day, produces gallery exhibitions, illustrated catalogs, and a variety of public programs. The quality of our exhibitions attests to the diversity and heritage of the Americas, and upholds the mandate of the Americas Society to foster a better understanding of the art made in these regions from the pre-Columbian era to the present day.

The visual arts program boasts the longest-standing private space in the United States dedicated to exhibiting and promoting art from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Canada. Americas Society is recognized for its catalyzing role in establishing Latin American art markets in the United States and helping to expand the notion of modernity in the western hemisphere. The success of the department is rooted in its role as not merely a consecratory venue, but also as a platform for new artistic visions and achievements from throughout the Americas.

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Upcoming Exhibition

José Leonilson: Empty Man

September 27 to February 3, 2018

José Leonilson (1957-1993) came of age as an artist during the 80s generation in Brazil. What he shared with this diverse artistic milieu was the so-called ‘joy of painting,’ rediscovered in the years following the end of Brazil’s dictatorship. What separated him from his contemporaries was his personal way of working and his distinct aesthetic centered on raw emotional feelings, introspective musings, and private affairs.

This Fall, Americas Society will present José Leonilson: Empty Man, the first U.S. solo exhibition of this key Brazilian artist. Focusing on Leonilson’s production as a mature artist, the show will feature approximately fifty paintings, drawings, and intimate embroideries made between the mid-1980s until 1993, when the artist died of AIDS. This short yet prolific period showcases the artist’s fully developed language, connecting Leonilson’s oeuvre with contemporary art practices, Brazilian vernacular traditions, and global issues prompted by the AIDS crisis. By taking as its starting point the works produced during the last three years of his life and moving backwards into the 1980s, the exhibition maps Leonilson’s artistic journey following the reverse chronology of T.S. Eliot: “in the beginning is my end. In my end is my beginning.”

Learn more about the exhibition.

The Visual Arts program boasts the longest-standing private space in the U.S. dedicated to exhibiting and promoting art from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Canada; it has achieved a unique and renowned leadership position in the field, producing both historical and contemporary exhibitions. The Visual Arts program present three exhibitions annually, each accompanied by a series of public and educational programs featuring outstanding artists, curators, critics and scholars.

Explore our past exhibitions below, and view a timeline of Visual Arts exhibitions dating back to 1967.

Past Exhibitions

As a Satellite Space: Res do Chao

December 02, 2003

Rés de Chão, the fourth participant in As a Satellite was founded in 2002 and operated from the small apartment of artist and cultural producer Edson Barros in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. For As a Satellite: Rés de Chão initiated a process-based project that generated new situations and created meeting points between cultural producers in Rio de Janeiro and New York City. ... Read More

As a Satellite Space: Instant Coffee

October 10, 2003

As a Satellite: Instant Coffee included the work of dozens of artists from Canada and abroad through a number of events, from slideshow talks to video screenings to performances. As a Satellite was a program with independent cultural initiatives in Latin America, Canada, and the Caribbean, which consisted of positioning and using Americas Society as their satellite for the production of exhibitions and event-based projects in New York. ... Read More

As a Satellite Space: Backyard

July 12, 2003

Muro Sur was an artist-run center in Santiago, Chile, and the second participant in As a Satellite. Founded in 1998, it concentrated on organizing and presenting exhibitions of Chilean experimental and contemporary art. Muro Sur’s project explored the idea that Latin America is the "backyard" of the United States and highlighted the emblematic coincidence of September 11, 1973, in Chile and September 11, 2001, in New York City. ... Read More

Puerto Rican Light: Allora & Calzadilla

May 18, 2003

Puerto Rican Light included three works by Jennifer Allora and Guillermo Calzadilla that utilized a variety of representational means to convey light "from" the island of Puerto Rico: the installation Traffic Patterns (2001-2003), a photograph from the series Seeing Otherwise (1999-2003), and the sculptural project Puerto Rican Light (2003). ... Read More

As a Satellite Space: La Panadería

July 02, 2002

La Panadería, an artist-run center in Mexico City, was the first participant of As a Satellite. For this series the collective created not merely an exhibition space, but a versatile, multi-purpose, activity-based art center. ... Read More

Forma:Brazil, Iran do Espírito Santo and Rivane Neuenschwander

May 29, 2001

This show focused on the recent production of Iran do Espirito Santo and Rivane Neuenschwander. Both artists created spare and ephemeral works that recalled not only American minimalism, but also the innovative and experimental art of the concrete and neo-concrete movements in Brazil in the 1950s and 1960s. ... Read More

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Special editions of books covering visual arts of the western Hemisphere and published by the Americas Society.

The Visual Arts department offers a variety of beautifully illustrated catalogues that chronicle past Americas Society exhibitions.

Embodied Abstraction: Laura Anderson Barbata, Linda Matalon, Ricardo Mazal

Friday, January 31, 1997

This exhibition catalogue covers the work of three artists in New York, whose paintings, sculptures, and drawings engage the modernist tradition and the legacy of abstraction while addressing concerns of the human body. Anderson and Mazal hail from Mexico, while Matalon is a Cuban American. The catalogue includes texts by Joseph R. Wolin. ... Read More

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