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Eric Farnsworth

Vice President, COA, Washington D.C. Office

Eric Farnsworth has led the Washington office of the Council of the Americas and the Americas Society since 2003, during which time the stature and influence of the organization has grown significantly. He has played an important thought leadership and advocacy role across the broad range of issues affecting U.S. relations with the Western Hemisphere, including economic development, trade, and energy; Asia-Latin American relations and broader BRICS and global governance issues; security; and democracy. He is a widely sought-after conference speaker and media commentator, and has published articles and opinion pieces in numerous leading newspapers and policy journals. 

Farnsworth began his career in Washington with the U.S. Department of State after obtaining an MPA in international relations from Princeton’s Woodrow Wilson School. During his time in government he served in positions of increasing responsibility in the foreign policy and trade communities, from Western Hemisphere Affairs at State to the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, culminating in a three and a half year appointment as the senior advisor to the White House special envoy for the Americas. In this capacity he played an important role in developing and implementing the Clinton administration’s policies toward the Western Hemisphere. He was awarded the Superior Honor Award three times. 

In between his government and nonprofit experiences, Farnsworth was managing director of ManattJones Global Strategies, a Washington and Los Angeles-based advisory and strategic consulting group. While there, he worked successfully to advance client interests particularly in the agriculture, auto, and technology sectors. Before coming to Washington he also worked in the global public policy division of Bristol-Myers Squibb, and in the U.S. Senate with Sam Nunn (D-GA) and the U.S. House of Representatives with John Edward Porter (R-IL). He also worked briefly at the U.S. Consulate in Johannesburg, South Africa.

Eric Farnsworth is a Truman Scholar, an alumnus of the Leadership America, Young Leaders of the (NATO) Alliance, and the U.S.-Spain Young Leaders programs, and has participated by invitation on programs with the Atlantic Council, the Bertelsmann Foundation, the Carter Center, and the German Marshall Fund, among others. Previously he served as president of the Western Hemisphere Committee of the Greater Washington Board of Trade, a member of the Secretary of State’s Advisory Committee on International Economic Policy, and a board member of Princeton in Latin America (PiLA). In 2016 he was decorated by the king and ambassador of Spain for his work to promote bilateral and regional relations.   
 

Areas of Expertise: Asia in the Americas, trade, energy, US policy in the region, national security affairs, international sports (including World Cup and Olympics), congressional affairs.

Contributions from Eric Farnsworth

Recast Labour Law to Rescue Latin America's Youth

Thursday, June 22, 2006  |  Eric Farnsworth and Christopher Sabatini  |  Financial Times

The cry from the streets offers a real opportunity for governments to strike an innovative balance: reform laws to reduce the burden on employers to hire and fire employees while aggressively working to improve labour and social protections for all workers, including those in the informal sector. ... Read More

Don't Judge Bolivia Through a Leftist Prism

Saturday, March 11, 2006  |  Eric Farnsworth and Christopher Sabatini  |  The Miami Herald

With Iraq and other priorities competing for the attention of U.S. policymakers, the question of Bolivia is overlooked. But, situated in the heart of South America, with the second-largest natural gas reserves in the Western Hemisphere, Bolivia's unsettled course bears close watch. ... Read More

Latin America's Lurch to the Left

Monday, February 13, 2006  |  Eric Farnsworth and Christopher Sabatini  |  The Christian Science Monitor

In the end, elections in the hemisphere will produce governments with which the US will share more in common than not. The trick will be to remain engaged with those governments as they tackle the difficult problems of addressing structural poverty, exclusion, and inequality with respect for democratic institutions and rights. ... Read More

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