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Guide: The 2016 U.S. Elections

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Mapping the Latino Vote

2016

  • May 4 — John Kasich, the last remaining Republican challenger to Donald Trump, drops out of the race.
  • May 3 — After losing to Donald Trump in the Indiana primary by almost 20 points, Ted Cruz suspends his campaign.
  • April 26 — Donald Trump sweeps Connecticut, Delaware, Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island primaries, while Hillary Clinton wins all but Rhode Island.
  • April 19 — Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump nab wins in New York.
  • April 5 — Ted Cruz and Bernie Sanders win their respective races in Wisconsin.
  • March 26 — Bernie Sanders sweeps the Alaska, Washington state, and Hawaii Democratic caucuses.
  • March 22 — Ted Cruz and Bernie Sanders win Utah and Idaho, while Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton take Arizona.
  • March 15 — Florida, Illinois, Missouri, North Carolina, and Ohio all hold primaries. Hillary Clinton sweeps the Democratic side, while John Kasich wins his home state of Ohio, the one state Donald Trump does not win for the GOP. After losing by almost 20 points to Trump in his home state of Florida, Marco Rubio suspends his campaign.
  • March 10 — Republicans hold their twelfth debate in Miami, Florida.
  • March 9 — Univision hosts the eighth Democratic debate in Miami, Florida.
  • March 8 — Hawaii Republican caucus, Idaho Republican primary, Michigan and Mississippi primaries
  • March 6 — Maine Democratic caucus, Puerto Rico Republican primary. That evening, CNN will host the seventh Democratic debate in Flint, Michigan.
  • March 5 — Kansas and Louisiana primaries, Kentucky and Maine Republican caucuses, Nebraska Democratic caucus.
  • March 3 — Fox News hosts the eleventh Republican debate in Detroit, Michigan. Bret Baier, Megyn Kelly, and Chris Wallace moderated.
  • March 2 — Ben Carson effectively drops out of the GOP race, leaving just four candidates.
  • March 1 — Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump solidify their places as the respective Democratic and Republican frontrunners in Super Tuesday voting, winning seven states each. Bernie Sanders wins the remaining four Democrat races, while Ted Cruz and Marco Rubio split the other GOP ones three to one.
  • February 27 — Hillary Clinton wins the South Carolina Democratic primary.
  • February 25 — The five GOP candidates hold their 10th debate, this one in Houston, Texas, sponsored by CNN and Telemundo, moderated by Wolf Blitzer.
  • February 23 — Donald Trump wins the Nevada Republican caucus with 45.9 percent of the vote.
  • February 20 — Hillary Clinton wins the Nevada Democratic caucus with 52.6 percent of votes, while Donald Trump wins the South Carolina GOP primary with 32.5 percent and a 10-point margin. Jeb Bush ends his campaign for the Republican nomination after placing fourth.
  • February 13 — CBS hosts the ninth Republican debate in Greenville, South Carolina. John Dickerson moderates.
  • February 12 — Jim Gilmore exits the GOP race.
  • February 11 — The sixth Democratic debate takes place in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. PBS hosts, with moderators Gwen Ifill and Judy Woodruff.
  • February 10 — Following disappointing performances in New Hampshire, Chris Christie and Carly Fiorina suspend their campaigns for the Republican nomination.
  • February 9 — New Hampshire primaries take place. Bernie Sanders beats Hillary Clinton in the Democratic contest by more than 20 points, 60.4 percent to 38.0 percent. On the Republican side, Donald Trump wins with 35.3 percent of votes over John Kasich's 15.8 percent,
  • February 6 — Seven candidates participate in the eighth GOP debate, which is hosted by ABC News and IJReview in Manchester, New Hampshire, with moderators David Muir and Martha Raddatz.
  • February 4 — The two Democratic candidates hold their fifth debate. MSNBC hosts in Durham, New Hampshire, with Chuck Todd and Rachel Maddow moderating.
  • February 3 — Both Rand Paul and Rick Santorum drop out of the GOP race.
  • February 1 — The first voting of the 2016 race kicks off with the Iowa caucuses. Ted Cruz wins on the GOP side with 27.7 percent of the vote. Donald Trump finishes second (24.3) and Marco Rubio third (23.1). Mike Huckabee announces he's suspending his campaign; 11 candidates remain in the Republican race. On the Democrat's side, Hillary Clinton (49.9) narrowly edges out Bernie Sanders (49.6). Martin O'Malley ends his bid for the Democratic nomination.
  • January 28 — Fox News hosts the seventh Republican debate in Des Moines, Iowa. Bret Baier, Megyn Kelly, and Chris Wallace moderate. 
  • January 17 — Democrats hold their fourth debate in Charleston, South Carolina, which is hosted by NBC and the Congressional Black Caucus Institute, and moderated by Lester Holt.
  • January 14 — Republicans hold their sixth debate in North Charleston, South Carolina. The Fox Business Network hosts, and Neil Cavuto and Maria Bartiromo moderate.

 

2015

  • December 30 George Pataki ends his bid for the Republican nomination.
  • December 21 — Lindsey Graham drops out of the GOP race.
  • December 19 — Democrats hold their third debate in Manchester, New Hampshire. The event is hosted by ABC News and moderated by David Muir and Martha Raddatz.
  • December 15 — Republicans hold their fifth debate in Las Vegas, Nevada, which is hosted by CNN, and moderated by Wolf Blitzer.
  • November 17 Bobby Jindal drops out of the Republican race.
  • November 14 — CBS News hosts the second debate between the Democratic candidates in Des Moines, Iowa. John Dickerson hosts.
  • November 10 — GOP candidates hold their fourth debate in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, hosted by Fox Business Network (FBN) and The Wall Street Journal (WSJ). FBN Anchors Bartiromo and Cavuto, along with WSJ Editor-in-Chief Gerard Baker moderate.
  • November 6 — MSNBC hosts a Democratic candidates forum in Rock Hill, South Carolina, in which host Rachel Maddow interviews the three candidates one by one.

 

  • October 28 — Republicans hold their third debate in Boulder, Colorado, focusing on the economy. CNBC hosts, with Carl Quintanilla, Betsy Quick, and John Harwood moderating. The four lowest-polling candidates debate at 6 p.m. ET, followed by the top 10 candidates at 8 p.m.
  • October 23 — Lincoln Chafee withdraws from the Democratic race, narrowing that field to three candidates.
  • October 21 — After months of intense speculation, Vice President Joe Biden announces he will not run for the Democratic nomination.
  • October 20 — Jim Webb announces he is dropping out of the Democratic race, but leaves the door open to a possible bid as an independent.
  • October 13 — The first debate among the five Democratic candidates kicks off from Las Vegas, Nevada. CNN hosts with Facebook; CNN's Anderson Cooper moderates, and Dana Bash and Juan Carlos López also pose questions to the candidates.

 

  • September 19 — Given falling poll numbers, Scott Walker becomes the second Republican hopeful to bow out of the race after a little over two months of campaigning.
  • September 16 — CNN hosts the second Republican debate in Simi Valley, California, with the 11 leading candidates in CNN's election polls. Jake Tapper moderates, with Hugh Hewitt contributing additional questions.
  • September 11 — One hundred days after launching his campaign, Rick Perry becomes the first GOP candidate to drop out. In his announcement, Perry called for an immigration debate "without inflammatory rhetoric, without base appeals that divide us based on race, culture, and creed."

 

  • August 6 — Republican candidates hold their first primary debates in Cleveland, Ohio. Fox News and Facebook host the debates. Fox's Bret Baier, Megyn Kelly, and Chris Wallace moderate the main debate with the 10 candidates leading the polls; Bill Hemmer and Martha MacCallum moderate the so-called "happy hour" debate with the remaining seven candidates.

 

  • July 29 — Former Virginia Governor Jim Gilmore becomes the 17th and final entrant into the GOP race.
  • July 21 — Ohio Governor John Kasich announces his bid for the Republican nomination.
  • July 13 — Wisconsin Governor Scott Walker launches his Republican bid.
  • July 3 — One-term Virginia Senator and former Assistant Defense Secretary Jim Webb joins the Democratic race via an announcement on his website.

 

  • June 30 — Long-rumored to be running, Chris Christie officially announces his entry into the Republican race.
  • June 24 — Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindahl enters the Republican fray with an announcement on Twitter.
  • June 16 — Businessman and real estate mogul Donald Trump announces his bid for the GOP ticket with an eccentric speech, notable for its comments on immigration, and quickly becomes a focal point in the election.
  • June 15 — After months of fundraising, former Florida Governor Jeb Bush officially enters the Republican race.
  • June 4 — Ex-Texas Governor Rick Perry launches his second bid for the GOP nomination.
  • June 3 — Former Rhode Island Senator and Governor Lincoln Chafee announces his entry into the Democratic race.
  • June 1 — South Carolina Senator Lindsey Graham, one of the few Republicans who supports a pathway to citizenship, joins the Republican race.

 

  • May 30 — Former Baltimore Mayor and Maryland Governor Martin O'Malley becomes the third Democratic candidate.
  • May 28 — Former three-term Governor of New York George Pataki joins the GOP race.
  • May 27 — Ex-Representative and Senator from Pennsylvania Rick Santorum launches a second campaign on the Republican ticket.
  • May 5 — Former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee announces his second bid for the Republican nomination.
  • May 4 — Retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson and former Hewlett-Packard CEO Carly Fiorina enter the Republican race.

 

  • April 30 — Vermont's independent Senator Bernie Sanders joins the Democratic race.
  • April 21 — New Jersey Governor Chris Christie speaks at the AS/COA 2015 Washington conference, touching on the importance of U.S. relations with neighbors Mexico and Canada.
  • April 13 — Florida Senator Marco Rubio joins the Republican field.
  • April 12 — After years of speculation, former First Lady, New York Senator, and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton announces her candidacy for the Democratic presidential nomination.
  • April 7 — Kentucky Senator Rand Paul launches his campaign for the Republican nomination.