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Visual Arts at Americas Society

Arts and Culture

Americas Society Gallery does not accept unsolicited submissions and materials. Our staff is not authorized to receive or review artist or exhibition proposals.

The Visual Arts program boasts the longest-standing private space in the U.S. dedicated to exhibiting and promoting art from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Canada; it has achieved a unique and renowned leadership position in the field, producing both historical and contemporary exhibitions. The Visual Arts program presents three exhibitions annually, each accompanied by a series of public and educational programs featuring outstanding artists, curators, critics and scholars. The Visual Arts program produces exhibition catalogues as well as scholarly publications, including the seminal work, A Principality of Its Own: 40 Years of Visual Arts at the Americas Society.

 

The Society’s Visual Arts department, dedicated to fostering a better understanding of art in the American regions beyond U.S. borders from the pre-Columbian era to the present day, produces gallery exhibitions, illustrated catalogs, and a variety of public programs. The quality of our exhibitions attests to the diversity and heritage of the Americas, and upholds the mandate of the Americas Society to foster a better understanding of the art made in these regions from the pre-Columbian era to the present day.

The visual arts program boasts the longest-standing private space in the United States dedicated to exhibiting and promoting art from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Canada. Americas Society is recognized for its catalyzing role in establishing Latin American art markets in the United States and helping to expand the notion of modernity in the western hemisphere. The success of the department is rooted in its role as not merely a consecratory venue, but also as a platform for new artistic visions and achievements from throughout the Americas.

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Upcoming Exhibition

Erick Meyenberg: The wheel bears no resemblance to a leg

May 4 to July 22, 2017
General Opening May 3

Borrowing its enigmatic title from the words of Guillaume Apollinaire, The wheel bears no resemblance to a leg chronicles the making of a multilayered project by Mexican artist Erick Meyenberg (b. 1980, Mexico City). Working for two years with a local high school marching band in Mexico City, Meyenberg orchestrated a complex performance which took place throughout the capital and provokes a reflection on the pedagogical machinery of discipline, education, gender, and the state.

Erick Meyenberg works at the intersection of drawing, collage, video, data analysis, and sound. La rueda no se parece a una pierna (The wheel bears no resemblance to a leg, 2016) is the end result of a long collaboration with members of the high school marching band Banda de Guerra Lobos at the Colegio Hispanoamericano in Mexico City. Meyenberg and the teenagers—together with curators, guest musicians, composers, choreographers, costume designers, and a video production team—cocreated the choreography and concomitant performances that took the band through some of Mexico City’s most emblematic and politically marked sites: the Plaza de Tlatelolco, where in 1968 striking university students clashed with the state; the Monument to the Revolution, commemorating the Mexican Revolution of 1910; and the shopping mall Centro Comercial Forum Buenavista, symbolizing Mexico’s embeddedness in transnational post-industrial capitalism.

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The Visual Arts program boasts the longest-standing private space in the U.S. dedicated to exhibiting and promoting art from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Canada; it has achieved a unique and renowned leadership position in the field, producing both historical and contemporary exhibitions. The Visual Arts program present three exhibitions annually, each accompanied by a series of public and educational programs featuring outstanding artists, curators, critics and scholars.

Explore our past exhibitions below, and view a timeline of Visual Arts exhibitions dating back to 1967.

Past Exhibitions

Aspects of Contemporary Mexican Painting

September 13, 1990

This exhibition was significant in that it focused on aspects of Mexican painting that had not been fully explored in previous exhibitions. Principal among these were the re-interpretation of Mexican identity, as well as the intense inward scrutiny of the artists’ individuality. ... Read More

The Book in the Americas

January 15, 1990

The exhibition featured a selection of rare, important books manufactured during the Colonial period in Latin America and New England. ... Read More

House of Miracles: Votive Sculpture from Northeastern Brazil

September 15, 1989

This exhibition focused on the ancient practice, continued to the present in Northeastern Brazil, of offering votive objects – ex-votos in Latin – to holy figures or saints. House of Miracles presented approximately 120 twentieth century sculptures commissioned for use as votive offerings, all outstanding examples of popular sculpture selected from the most important collections of Brazilian folk art. ... Read More

Southern Splendor

October 06, 1987

This exhibition featured 148 spectacular items of colonial silver from the celebrated collection of the Museo Isaac Fernández Blanco in Buenos Aires. Representing the seventeenth, eighteenth, and nineteenth centuries, this collection included pieces from Bolivia, Chile, Mexico, Peru, and Venezuela, as well as the Río de la Plata region encompassing Buenos Aires. ... Read More

Emiliano di Cavalcanti

May 05, 1987

Ninety-three of the finest drawings by noted Brazilian pioneer modernist Emiliano Di Cavalcanti from the Museu de Arte Contemporanea in Sau Paulo were featured in this exhibition. Small, anecdotal, and intimiate in scale, these pieces emphasized the period of the 1920s and 1930s when the artist reached the pinnacle of his career. ... Read More

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Special editions of books covering visual arts of the western Hemisphere and published by the Americas Society.

The Visual Arts department offers a variety of beautifully illustrated catalogues that chronicle past Americas Society exhibitions.

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