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Visual Arts at Americas Society

Arts and Culture

Americas Society Gallery does not accept unsolicited submissions and materials. Our staff is not authorized to receive or review artist or exhibition proposals.

The Visual Arts program boasts the longest-standing private space in the U.S. dedicated to exhibiting and promoting art from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Canada; it has achieved a unique and renowned leadership position in the field, producing both historical and contemporary exhibitions. The Visual Arts program presents three exhibitions annually, each accompanied by a series of public and educational programs featuring outstanding artists, curators, critics and scholars. The Visual Arts program produces exhibition catalogues as well as scholarly publications, including the seminal work, A Principality of Its Own: 40 Years of Visual Arts at the Americas Society.

 

The Society’s Visual Arts department, dedicated to fostering a better understanding of art in the American regions beyond U.S. borders from the pre-Columbian era to the present day, produces gallery exhibitions, illustrated catalogs, and a variety of public programs. The quality of our exhibitions attests to the diversity and heritage of the Americas, and upholds the mandate of the Americas Society to foster a better understanding of the art made in these regions from the pre-Columbian era to the present day.

The visual arts program boasts the longest-standing private space in the United States dedicated to exhibiting and promoting art from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Canada. Americas Society is recognized for its catalyzing role in establishing Latin American art markets in the United States and helping to expand the notion of modernity in the western hemisphere. The success of the department is rooted in its role as not merely a consecratory venue, but also as a platform for new artistic visions and achievements from throughout the Americas.

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Current Exhibition

Facundo de Zuviría: Siesta Argentina and other modest observations

January 25 to April 1, 2017
General Opening January 24

Facundo de Zuviría: Siesta Argentina and other modest observations is structured around the extraordinary photo-essay Siesta Argentina by Facundo de Zuviría (b. 1954). Comprising 36 black and white prints of closed storefronts in Buenos Aires, the series was triggered by the “corralito crisis”—the deep economic and social downturn that shook Argentina in 2001. As the photographer wandered through the streets of the Argentine capital, he delved into the complexities of an urban reality where modernity collides with the unintended and anachronistic beauty of a world on the verge of disappearance. In addition to Siesta Argentina, the exhibition includes photographic prints in color and black and white that retrace de Zuviría’s creative journeys, chronicling the vernacular architecture, design, and urban landscape of the photographer’s native Buenos Aires.

Learn more about the exhibition.

The Visual Arts program boasts the longest-standing private space in the U.S. dedicated to exhibiting and promoting art from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Canada; it has achieved a unique and renowned leadership position in the field, producing both historical and contemporary exhibitions. The Visual Arts program present three exhibitions annually, each accompanied by a series of public and educational programs featuring outstanding artists, curators, critics and scholars.

Explore our past exhibitions below, and view a timeline of Visual Arts exhibitions dating back to 1967.


Watch a video about the current exhibition:

Past Exhibitions

Marta Minujín: MINUCODEs

March 02, 2010

Marta Minujín’s Minucode (1968) explored social codes in four groups of leading figures in the arts, business, fashion, and politics in New York. MINUCODEs revisited that project more than 40 years later. Using recovered footage and documents, the exhibition shed light on the original mythical event. ... Read More

Fernell Franco: Amarrados [Bound]

September 17, 2009

Fernell Franco (Cali 1942-2006) is considered one of the few photographers who developed a distinct lyrical view of the shift towards modernity in Latin America. The exhibition Fernell Franco: Amarrados [Bound] is focused on the homonymous series comprising large-scale black and white photographs developed by Franco in the early 1980s. ... Read More

Dias & Riedweg...and it becomes something else

May 12, 2009

Mauricio Dias and Walter Riedweg have worked together since 1993, developing a cohesive body of work that delves into the poetic as well as the critical potential of the moving image. Americas Society’s exhibition was their first solo show in the United States. ... Read More

Carlos Cruz-Diez: (In)formed by Color

September 10, 2008

In the fall of 2008, Americas Society presented Carlos Cruz-Diez’s first solo show in a major U.S. cultural institution. Focusing on the relationship between color and perception, the exhibition will increase Cruz-Diez's visibility and appreciation in the United States, one of Latin America’s Kinetic Art masters. ... Read More

Torrijos: The Man and the Myth

January 31, 2008

Torrijos: The Man and the Myth was a unique exhibition of never-before-published photographs of former Panamanian leader Omar Torrijos by Graciela Iturbide, one of Mexico's most celebrated photographers. Omar Torrijos was Panama's most famous leader (from 1968 to 1981) and is one of the best-known twentieth century figures throughout Latin America. ... Read More

Beginning with a Bang! From Confrontation to Intimacy

September 28, 2007

Americas Society presented in the Fall of 2008 Beginning with a Bang! From Confrontation to intimacy, a reflection on the utopian and destructive impulses that marked the rise of Happenings and Conceptual art in Argentina. The exhibition focused primordially on action based gesture and its evolution throughout the movement from 1960-2007. ... Read More

Emancipatory Action: Paula Trope and the Meninos

May 24, 2007

Emancipatory Action: Paula Trope and the Meninos, curated by José Luis Falconi and Gabriela Rangel, was the first show of Paula Trope and the Meninos in the United States and focused on issues related to authorship and artistic collaboration. ... Read More

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Special editions of books covering visual arts of the western Hemisphere and published by the Americas Society.

The Visual Arts department offers a variety of beautifully illustrated catalogues that chronicle past Americas Society exhibitions.

Reproducing Nations: Types and Costumes in Asia and Latin America ca. 1800-1860

Friday, March 31, 2006

This innovative exhibition explores the descriptive tradition of "costumbrismo" as it developed in South America in the first half of the nineteenth century. The catalogue focuses on the cultural responses opened up by trade and commerce in the nineteenth century, and also traces the broad circulation of costume books, prints, and watercolors within South America, Asia, and Europe. ... Read More

José Gurvich: Constructive Imagination

Friday, September 30, 2005

This is the catalogue of the first solo institutional exhibition of Uruguayan artist José Gurvich in New York. This important exhibition of paintings, drawings, and ceramics, produced between 1957 and 1973, examines Gurvich’s role in the School of the South as a student of Joaquin Torres-García and an exponent of constructivism nationally and internationally. ... Read More

Havana: The Revolutionary Moment

Friday, May 31, 2002

Burt Glinn's photographs—of Fidel thronged by his fellow Cubans along the road to Havana, of troops embracing, and of fierce men and women taking up arms in the streets—are full of the revolutionary fervor and idealistic anticipation that characterized that moment in Cuban history. ... Read More

Pictures of You

Sunday, March 31, 2002

Rather than simply presenting a set of pictures, the works drawn for Pictures of You by the four Mexican artists, Inaki Bonillas, Minerva Cuevas, Mario Garcia-Torres, and Yoshua Okon, can be seen as artistic propositions that underline the significance and potential of imagination. ... Read More

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