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Visual Arts at Americas Society

Arts and Culture

Americas Society Gallery does not accept unsolicited submissions and materials. Our staff is not authorized to receive or review artist or exhibition proposals.

The Visual Arts program boasts the longest-standing private space in the U.S. dedicated to exhibiting and promoting art from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Canada; it has achieved a unique and renowned leadership position in the field, producing both historical and contemporary exhibitions. The Visual Arts program presents three exhibitions annually, each accompanied by a series of public and educational programs featuring outstanding artists, curators, critics and scholars. The Visual Arts program produces exhibition catalogues as well as scholarly publications, including the seminal work, A Principality of Its Own: 40 Years of Visual Arts at the Americas Society.

 

The Society’s Visual Arts department, dedicated to fostering a better understanding of art in the American regions beyond U.S. borders from the pre-Columbian era to the present day, produces gallery exhibitions, illustrated catalogs, and a variety of public programs. The quality of our exhibitions attests to the diversity and heritage of the Americas, and upholds the mandate of the Americas Society to foster a better understanding of the art made in these regions from the pre-Columbian era to the present day.

The visual arts program boasts the longest-standing private space in the United States dedicated to exhibiting and promoting art from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Canada. Americas Society is recognized for its catalyzing role in establishing Latin American art markets in the United States and helping to expand the notion of modernity in the western hemisphere. The success of the department is rooted in its role as not merely a consecratory venue, but also as a platform for new artistic visions and achievements from throughout the Americas.

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Exhibition On View

The Metropolis in Latin America, 1830-1930

March 22 to June 30, 2018

Over the course of a century of rapid urban growth, sociopolitical upheavals, and cultural transitions reshaped the architectural landscapes of major cities in Latin America. Focusing on six capitals—Buenos Aires, Havana, Lima, Mexico City, Rio de Janeiro, and Santiago de Chile—The Metropolis in Latin America, 1830–1930, presents the colonial city as a terrain shaped by Iberian urban regulations, and the republican city as an arena of negotiation of previously imposed and newly imported models, which were later challenged by waves of indigenous revivals. Photographs, prints, plans, and maps depict the urban impact of key societal and economic transformations, including the emergence of a bourgeois elite, and extensive infrastructure projects, rapid industrialization, and commercialization.

This exhibition was co-curated by Idurre Alonso and Maristella Casciato and organized by the Getty Research Institute in Los Angeles.

Learn more about the exhibition.

The Visual Arts program boasts the longest-standing private space in the U.S. dedicated to exhibiting and promoting art from Latin America, the Caribbean, and Canada; it has achieved a unique and renowned leadership position in the field, producing both historical and contemporary exhibitions. The Visual Arts program present three exhibitions annually, each accompanied by a series of public and educational programs featuring outstanding artists, curators, critics and scholars.

Explore our past exhibitions below, and view a timeline of Visual Arts exhibitions dating back to 1967.

Past Exhibitions

Still Life: The Body as Object in Contemporary Photography

February 28, 1995

This exhibition featured the work of artists from various parts of the Americas, all of whom used non-traditional modes of photography in order to explore the theme of the body and interpret the human form as a site of ritual, meditation, or transcendental exploration. ... Read More

Visions of Modernity: Photographs from the Peruvian Andes, 1900-1930

June 09, 1994

This exhibition featured some 100 black-and-white photographs by the leading practitioners of the medium working in the southern Andes in the first decades of the twentieth century. These works presented a vibrant image of a nation at the dawn of the modern era – a period in Peru of economic prosperity, social progress and general optimism. ... Read More

Witnesses of Time: Photographs by Flor Garduño

January 21, 1993

The approximately 100 images contained in the exhibit Witnesses of Time: Photographs by Flor Garduño conveyed a poetic and intimate vision of surviving indigenous communities in the Americas, particularly in rural areas of Mexico, Guatemala, Peru, Bolivia, and Ecuador. ... Read More

Wifredo Lam: A Retrospective of Works on Paper

September 18, 1992

Curated by Dr. Charles Merewther, the exhibition Wifredo Lam: A Retrospective of Works on Paper featured a selection of 76 extraordinary works on paper including drawings, prints, and books by the artist, who was born in Sagua la Grande, Cuba 1902, and who died in Paris in 1982. ... Read More

Barroco de la Nueva Granada: Colonial Art from Colombia and Ecuador

May 14, 1992

Barroco de la Nueva Granada: Colonial Art from Colombia and Ecuador, a didactive and visually exciting exhibition, focused on the major forms of artistic expression that flourished in colonial South America from the mid 1600s through the 1700s. Through a carefully selected group of objects, the exhibit examined the major stylistic traits, iconography and symbols of colonial Colombian and Ecuadorian painting and sculpture. ... Read More

Guamán Poma de Ayala: The Colonial Art of an Andean Author

January 01, 1992

This exhibit included reproductions of 100 of the 380 drawings that Guamán Poma created for his 1,188 page Nueva corónica. Written by a native Andean in early colonial Peru, Felipe Guamán Poma de Ayala, the Nueva corónica was a letter addressed to King Philip III of Spain to inform him about affairs in Peru and to urge better government of his colony. ... Read More

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Special editions of books covering visual arts of the western Hemisphere and published by the Americas Society.

The Visual Arts department offers a variety of beautifully illustrated catalogues that chronicle past Americas Society exhibitions.

Realism and Latin American Paintings: 1970s

Thursday, January 31, 1980

This bilingual exhibition catalogue by Lawrence Alloway examines the work of twelve realist and photorealist painters: Carlos Arnaiz, Ever Astudillo, Claudio Bravo, Santiago Cárdenas, Bill Caro, Gregorio Cuartas, Julio Larraz, Darío Morales, Oscar Muñioz, Saturnino Ramirez, Emilio Sánchez, Antonio Seguí. Co-published by the Museo de Monterrey, Mexico. ... Read More

Ron Martin and Henry Saxe

Tuesday, January 31, 1978

This exhibition catalogue features the work of Canadian painter Ron Martin and sculptor Henry Saxe and includes essays by Pierre Théberge and bilingual (English, French) statements by Martin and Saxe. It was  published by The National Gallery of Canada. ... Read More

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